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From left, Manuel Blandino Rosano, Ph.D., with Ernesto Bernal-Mizrachi, M.D.

Research Illuminates Potential Pathway to Type 2 Diabetes

Researchers at the Diabetes Research Institute at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are taking a closer look at a cell signaling pathway known to be important in regulation of insulin sensitivity. Specifically, they want to learn more about how changes in this mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway within beta cells of the pancreas can lead to development of type 2 diabetes.

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From left, Maria Santaella, M.S.N., RN-BC, with Val D. Bias, CEO of the National Hemophilia Foundation. Video

Maria Santaella Wins Nurse of the Year Award from National Hemophilia Foundation

Maria E. Santaella, M.S.N., RN-BC, hemophilia nurse coordinator in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has received the Nurse of the Year Award from the National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF). The award was presented during the foundation’s recent annual meeting in Chicago.

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Opioid Crisis Linked to Rise in Fungal Eye Infections, Say Bascom Palmer Researchers

A rise in fungal infections of the retina is linked to the nation’s opioid crisis, according to researchers at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. Physicians treating intravenous drug users should be aware of this dangerous complication and screen their patients for recent changes in their vision.

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University of Miami is First to Use New Epidural Device for Pain Management

University of Miami physicians are the first in the United States to offer patients pain relief using a new epidural infusion device recently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The new instrument makes it easier to verify correct placement of the epidural injection.

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Joshua M. Hare, M.D.

Study Shows Stem Cell Therapy Dosing Matters in Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

The Phase II TRIDENT study, led by Joshua M. Hare, M.D., and colleagues at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, found that a dose of 100 million allogeneic human mesenchymal stem cells, versus 20 million, was more effective in decreasing scar tissue and restoring left ventricular ejection fraction in study of 30 people with ischemic cardiomyopathy.

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