e-Update: News for University of Miami Miller School of Medicine Faculty and Staff

Up Front

Dileep R. Yavagal, M.D.

Dileep R. Yavagal, M.D.

First Stroke Patients in Florida Treated in UM Stem Cell Trial

The first two stroke patients have been enrolled in a phase 2 clinical trial of a revolutionary new treatment for ischemic stroke being conducted at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital. The trial, using a patient’s own bone marrow stem cells, is the first intra-arterial stroke stem cell trial in the U.S., and the two UM/Jackson patients are the first in Florida to participate.

Led by Dileep Yavagal, M.D., assistant professor of neurology and neurological surgery, the trial is examining the efficacy of ALD-401, derived from bone marrow, to repair and regenerate tissue following an ischemic event.

James Anderson, a physical education teacher from Maine, is hopeful that participating in the double-blind study will help him recover more quickly.

Read more about the Miller School's stem cell trial »

Research News

Members of the biostatistics team are, from left, front row, Administrator Maria Jimenez-Rodriguez, M.A.L.S., Director Shari Messinger, M.E., Ph.D., associate professor of epidemiololgy and public health, and Ph.D. student Fei Tang, and in back row, from left, biostatisticians Hua Li, Ph.D., assistant scientist, Robert Duncan, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology and public health, and Kaming Lo, M.P.H.

Members of the biostatistics team are, from left, front row, Administrator Maria Jimenez-Rodriguez, M.A.L.S., Director Shari Messinger, M.E., Ph.D., associate professor of epidemiololgy and public health, and Ph.D. student Fei Tang, and in back row, from left, biostatisticians Hua Li, Ph.D., assistant scientist, Robert Duncan, Ph.D., professor of epidemiology and public health, and Kaming Lo, M.P.H.

Clinical and Translational Science Institute Announces Credits for Biostatistics Consultations

The Biostatistics Collaboration and Consulting Core (BCCC) is collaborating with the Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) to offer service credits for enhanced biostatistics support for clinical and translational research.

Consistent with the Miami CTSI’s emphasis on culturalized health research, the BCCC supports interdisciplinary clinical and translational research that focuses on health concerns highly prevalent in ethnic and racial minority and medically underserved communities.

Made possible through the Miami CTSI, the biostatistics service credits are available to researchers who meet specific guidelines. Priority will be given to junior investigators preparing NIH grants, senior investigators focusing on new approaches, and investigators with NIH- and intramurally funded studies that require supplements to achieve major interdisciplinary breakthroughs.

Read more about the biostatistics core »

More News

Xue Zhong Liu, M.D., Ph.D.

Xue Zhong Liu, M.D., Ph.D.

Researchers Identify Gene Linked to Progressive Hearing Loss from Noise and Aging

An international team of researchers led by the Miller School’s Xue Zhong Liu, M.D., Ph.D., has identified the first gene to be associated with both noise-reduced and age-related hearing loss. The gene, P2X2, appears to be crucial to the preservation of life-long normal hearing and for protection against noise.

In the study published January 24 in the early online issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), Liu, associate professor and Director of Research in the Department of Otolaryngology, and his team found that a mutation in P2X2 increases the susceptibility to both age- and noise-related hearing loss associated with DFNA41, a form of progressive nonsyndromic hearing loss that begins early in life, often in adolescence, and progresses with age. Generally accompanied by high frequency tinnitus, high-pitched ringing in the ears, the hearing loss ranges from severe to profound over decades.

Read more about the study »

Stefan Glück, M.D., Ph.D.

Stefan Glück, M.D., Ph.D.

Gift Supports Breast Cancer Research at Sylvester

The Karen Mullen Breast Cancer Foundation has awarded $35,000 to Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center to support the groundbreaking work of Stefan Glück, M.D., Ph.D., Sylvester Professor of Medicine. The grant specifically supports Glück’s research into estrogen receptors in breast cancer.

Certain breast cancer patients benefit from anti-estrogen treatments. However, those with triple negative disease present a complex case: their estrogen receptors are either missing or, as Glück collaborator Zafar Nawaz, Ph.D., previously demonstrated, are degraded faster in breast cells by what is called a ubiquitin system. Ubiquitin systems, which destroy proteins in cells, were discovered in 2004 by Aaron Ciechanover, M.D., D.Sc., who subsequently won a Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his finding.

Read more about the gift »

Top U.S. Policy and Industry Leaders to Discuss Election’s Impact on Healthcare Reform

In the wake of the 2012 U.S. presidential and congressional elections, the School of Business Administration will bring together some of the nation’s leading healthcare policy and industry leaders for a conference focused on the impact of the election results on healthcare reform, as well as healthcare organizations and business in general.

The conference, “The Business of Healthcare Post-Election,” will be held on Friday, February 1, from 8:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the BankUnited Center.

Read more about the conference and register »

Call for Nominations: Discovery Science Grand Rounds

The basic science chairs at the Miller School invite all departments conducting discovery science research to nominate one or more faculty members to present this year’s Discovery Science Grand Rounds by submitting the faculty member’s name and a brief summary of the proposed topic by January 31.

The Discovery Science presentations should convey novel concepts and insights without focusing on a narrow set of specialized data. Diagrammatic summaries and graphics are encouraged, but over-generalization should be avoided.

The next series of Discovery Science Grand Rounds, held the second Thursday of each month, will start Thursday, March 14, from 5 to 6 p.m. at the Lois Pope LIFE Center, seventh-floor auditorium. The 40-minute lectures, which have a format similar to keynote lectures at scientific meetings, will focus on fields of exceptional significance and novelty with a broad interdisciplinary interest. Only UM faculty will be invited to present.

Read more about Discovery Science Grand Rounds and submit your nomination »